Tag Archives: European Commission

Fight For Your Right To Privacy (Or Someone Else Will)

It’s not like the citizens of Europe are taking to the streets to defend their right to keep their private dataprivate. They are probably not quite sure who to defend themself against. But an increasing number ofacademics and intellectuals across the EU are now lining up as the frontline in the upcoming battle of electronic consumer data. The computer industry lures with huge national income and millions of new jobs if they just get complete  access to the information about your online activity stored in hundreds of large databases around the world.

 “The fact that so many came to sign the position actually shows that the situation is serious.”

Kai Rannenberg

lobby

Leading academics across Europe are signing an online petition to support the European Commission’s draft data protection regulation in protest at industry lobbying to weaken it. So far, more than 80 professors from computer science, law, economics and business administration disciplines have joined. The industry’s hunt for profit could seriously undermine people’s trust in companies who want to use their personal data, they warn,  pointing out the financial risk involved.

The outraging professors refers to a study conducted by the US based firm, Boston Consulting Group, that states profit potential could be seriously undermined if people do not trust companies who want to use their personal data. The group estimates €440 billion in 2020 in the EU alone is at risk if the industry fails to establish a trusted flow of data.

The computer industry’s lobbyists, on the other hand, are waving with surveys that says the companies will generate $1.1 trillion in revenue in 2015, while creating nearly 14 million new jobs worldwide.

It may seem like the two conflicting parties are living in two separate worlds, (and to some degree they do), but soon we will all be united in one big global network called “The Cloud“.

“Currently, companies can process personal data without client consent if they can argue that they have a legitimate interest in the use of that data. So far, unfortunately, the term “legitimate interest” leaves plenty of room for interpretation: When is an interest legitimate and when is it not?”

You see, there are two things going on here:

Writing Their Own Laws

First, the development of what the geeks call cloud computing, which means that data is stored on random servers around the globe instead of your own hard disk. This new technology is expected to change the whole computer business radically, making it possible to access and analyze large amount of information anywhere in the world.

Second, the EU commission is about to finalize an update of the 18-year-old directive that aims to bring the law in line with the latest technologies. And this is where the privacy issue comes in.

FULL POST@Rational Arrogance

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Filed under International Econnomic Politics, Laws and Regulations, Technology

Neutral Stupidity

The EU lawmakers are about to finalize rules for a single supervisory mechanism (SSM) coordinated by the ECB. The European Commission is expected to table legislation for a resolution mechanism to wind up ailing banks within the coming months. European Central Bank (ECB) chief Mario Draghi said on Monday in the European Parliament that a euro zone banking union will need a common resolution fund, and that it has to be “fiscally neutral over the medium term.” How can another European bank bailout fund be fiscally neutral?

 “The European Resolution Fund should be backed by a public backstop mechanism to ensure that it would be fiscally neutral over the medium term.”

Mario Draghi

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Yup..neutral, but only over the medium term. Sooner or later the taxpayers will have to pay for this bailout, too…

Speaking with MEPs on the monetary affairs committee, Draghi said that the resolution fund should be financed via levies to safeguard against having to “recourse to taxpayer money,” the EUobserver.com reports.

Levies, hu?

ESMHere are some related words:

Also, the European Resolution Fund “should be backed by a public backstop mechanism,”  Mr. Draghi added, to ensure that it would be “fiscally neutral over the medium term.”

I’m sorry, but this sounds like pure nonsense to me.

There’s nothing new here – just another way to ensure that the bailout mechanisms already set up by the EU  leaders – the European Stability Mechanism (ESM) and the European Financial Stabilisation Mechanism (EFSM) – will still be in place when the European banking union becomes a reality.

But the need for a pan-European resolution fund is widely accepted among most EU lawmakers. However, some countries fear it could lead to their taxpayers financing bank rescues in other countries.

Well, I think they’re on to something….

Meanwhile, Draghi continues to kick the can, downplaying the recent diplomatic row over the exchange rate policy of the euro, dismissing it as “excessive” talks of a currency war involving the euro zone, Japan and the US.

He also said that the ECB did not regard the euro zone exchange rate as “a policy target, but it is important for growth and price stability.”

Important, but not a target….

And, according to the bank’s economic forecasts, the euro zone economy will fall by 0.3 percent in 2013, although Draghi indicated that he expected “a gradual recovery later this year.”

Heard that one, too…..quite a few times over the last five years.

bailout_packages

Related by econoTwist’s:

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Our Daily Warning

As the government of Romania falls as another victim of the economic crisis, the global political risk factor continue to rise and the odds of even more social unrest gains a few more percentage points. EconoTwist’s and many bloggers , analysts and researchers,  have been warning about this for years. But perhaps it’s time for another warning?

 “With people already questioning a model of society prone to generate inequalities, civil unrest in one country would rapidly spark political turmoil and social dissatisfaction across Europe. Foreign investors would fly away from Euro-denominated assets, scared by a spiral of riots, selective defaults, and low GDP that would eventually lead the Euro to collapse.”

Edoardo Campanella

Romanian Prime Minister Emil Boc on Monday announced his resignation after three weeks of anti-government protests in the country, following in the footsteps of Giorgio Papandreou and Silvio Berlusconi.

He said he took this decision in order to calm “social tensions” and so the “economic stability of the country” is not affected.

Well, the resigning of the PM’s in Greece and Italy doesn’t seem to have helped much in that matter.

See: World Erupts in Anger: “You Can’t Eat Money!” (Photo Coverage)

It seems more like political leaders fleeing from their responsibility.

And if someone don’t claim that responsibility soon, and start doing something about it, we may very well find ourselves in a helluva lot more trouble than we’re already in.

ReadEurope: “Time to Get Angry”

In case there is still anyone who not quite grasp the depth of this crisis, here’s the adviser for the Italian senate, Edoardo Campanella, to explain:

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The Social Consequences of the Euro Crisis

About a year ago the Arab spring taught the world an important, predictable lesson. When young people cease to be the engine of the economy and are excluded from the decision-making process, long-run economic growth is endangered and political stability undermined.

This lesson holds true for dictatorial regimes as well as for long-established democracies.

In Europe, a deteriorating youth marginalization is creating the preconditions for a social earthquake capable of shaking the old continent and impairing the survival of the Euro.

Until now, safety nets and intra-family transfers have prevented peaceful Indignados-style protests from turning into violent Arab-ones.

However, the shortfall of resources due to a new imminent recession, along with fiscal austerity measures, will impair this channel, whereas frustration and social resentment will keep growing

The figures are already alarming.

According to a report recently released by the European Commission, one in five young people is at risk of falling into poverty or social exclusion, only one third of young people are employed, and one in three has been out of work for over one year.

Moreover, 40 per cent of the unemployed are under 30, to the amount of 9 million people. On the other extreme of the age scale, the trend is reversed.

The employment rate for people aged 60-64 increased from 23% in 2000 to 34% in 2010.

In peripheral countries the situation is extremely acute.

The Portuguese government urged its young unemployed to leave Europe for better opportunities elsewhere, in Italy almost 120.000 young talents left the country last year, and in Spain thousands of people are pouring into former colonies in South America.

Across Europe, and even in Germany or Sweden, young workers are experiencing in-work poverty due to what economists call labor market dualism.

Unlike their older colleagues, they just have access to temporary contracts, which pays on average 14%  less than permanent contracts and are more vulnerable to sudden layoffs.

The medium-term economic and social consequences of such youth marginalization are huge.

  • First, an economy that is not nourished by fresh ideas loses competitiveness, becomes vulnerable to interest groups, suffocates material as well as intellectual progress, and is fated to stagnation or even prolonged recessions.
  • Second, high income volatility and job insecurity discourage the creation of new family units that are essential to generate social cohesion as well as inter-generational solidarity.
  • Finally, economic uncertainty tends to lower fertility rates with negative spillovers on the size of tomorrow’s workforce, population ageing, and the sustainability of public finances. The political implications could even be more disastrous.

Therefore, what begs asking is whether these economic factors could contribute to the eruption of an Arab spring in Europe.

There are, of course, huge economic and political differences between North Africa and Europe. The latter, unlike the former, is graying, prosperous, and democratic. But, paradoxically, the combination of these diverging demographic trends and opposite institutional features, along with the same aspiration for a better future, could lead to an identical result.

In North Africa young people represented the demographic majority of a despotic regimes, in Europe the political minority of a democratic system.

The former fought for an economic progress they just started to savor but that was hampered by the elite in power. The latter would fight for a material wellbeing that is only benefiting their older fellow citizens at their expenses.

Either way, young people can improve their situation and gain power only through violent rather than legal channels.

What event, if any, will inflame the upheaval in Europe, which country will be the epicenter of this social earthquake, and what impact it could have on the institutional, democratic order remain uncertain.

However, it is still possible to predict part of the effects.

With people already questioning a model of society prone to generate inequalities, civil unrest in one country would rapidly spark political turmoil and social dissatisfaction across Europe. Foreign investors would fly away from Euro-denominated assets, scared by a spiral of riots, selective defaults, and low GDP that would eventually lead the Euro to collapse.

Edoardo Campanella

To avoid this catastrophe, European governments should start promoting the role of the youth in their societies through family friendly policies, career paths related to productivity rather than to seniority, cross-country mobility, and the eradication of dual labor markets.

Spring is approaching. European leaders should act soon.

Edoardo Campanella is economic adviser to the Italian Senate.

This article is syndicated by www.eurointelligence.com.

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