Is The Global Economy Really Shock-Proof?

How many bailouts will people accept? Before someone is forced to default? The answer, my friend, is blowing in the wind. But the Economist’s Intelligence Unit is on the case.

“The global economy has endured an extraordinary array of shocks so far this year, from turbulence in the Middle East and North Africa to the Japanese tsunami. And yet growth prospects are reasonably good.”

Robin Bew


This blogger is far from sure about the global economy being shock-proof. But the Economist Intelligence Unit seems to think it is – almost. Anyway, it’s an interesting question.


“The global economy has endured an extraordinary array of shocks so far this year, from turbulence in the Middle East and North Africa to the Japanese tsunami. And yet growth prospects are reasonably good,” chief economist Robin Bew says in a presentations of EIU’s latest research.

In this webcast, he explain why they belive positives such as the continued US recovery are likely to offset at least in part some of the negatives. The webcast also gives EIU’s latest views on inflation, Japan‘s disaster response and the dollar.

The risk analysts looks at Russia‘s efforts to foster innovation. The country has many of the attributes needed for high-tech success, as well as problems – such as massive inefficiencies in the energy sector – for which innovation could provide solutions.

“But will the state’s paternalistic instincts get in the way?” EIU ask.

The industry experts examines the US retail market where, despite a fragile recovery in sales, vacancy rates in shopping malls have reached record highs.

“As US discount chains snap up good deals on the best locations, European retailers may be missing a rare opportunity.”

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3 responses to “Is The Global Economy Really Shock-Proof?

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