The Big Bailout Scam (EU Version)

While the recent Basle agreement requires banks to carry a slightly higher cash cushion, nothing has been done to re-establish the division between investment banking and commercial high-street banking. Except for a temporary ban on naked short sales in Germany, the derivatives trade remains mainly unregulated. Honorary Professorial Research Fellow in London, George Irvin, makes the picture crystal clear.

“How long will sensible people go on accepting this nonsense before venting their anger on our ruling classes?”

George Irvin


“It may sound like total madness, but that’s pretty well what’s happening to a growing number of Europeans (including Brits) today,” George Irvin writes in his latest blog post.

I don’t think anyone could tell the story of the European Great Resession better and more understandable than professor George Irvin does in his latest blog post at the EUobserver.com:

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Suppose that my rich neighbour down the road mortgaged his mansion up to the hilt to bet on the horses, ran up millions in debt and asked me, an ordinary punter, to pay off his debts plus interest.

Suppose that foolishly I accepted, and while I struggled to pay it off while barely able to feed my family and pay off the mortgage, my super-rich neighbour acquired an even bigger mansion.

To make matters worse, he used all sorts of clever dodges in the Caymans to pay negligible taxes, while if I failed to pay mine I knew I’d be sent to prison.

It may sound like total madness, but that’s pretty well what’s happening to a growing number of Europeans (including Brits) today.

How did we get here? In Britain, the 2008 credit crunch produced a massive recession which played havoc with government finances.

In Ireland the government took over the entire debt of its banking system, while in Greece, the rich paid minimal taxes and successive governments, unwilling to challenge them, indulged in creative accounting.

That’s somewhat simplified, but it’s the essence of the story.

Everywhere in Europe, voters are being told that decent pensions and universal welfare provision are no longer affordable and that we must all tighten our belts.

Governments can no longer borrow because the credit rating agencies might downgrade their bonds.

First it was Greece and Ireland, today it is Portugal, and tomorrow perhaps Spain, then Italy, and then … who knows?

But ordinary punters are starting to wake up.

Instead of enduring years of economic depression, the Greeks and the Irish will probably have to default, as will the Portuguese if their economy reacts the same way to belt-tightening.

And what if Spain has to be bailed out, still less defaults?

That would spell a major hit for banks in Germany, France, the UK (and elsewhere), all of which could easily add up to another major financial crisis.

Are we really so vulnerable?

The answer is indeed yes – because so little has been done to address the underlying causes of the 2008 crisis.

While the recent Basle Three agreement requires banks to carry a slightly higher cash cushion, nothing has been done to re-establish the division between investment banking and commercial high-street banking, a division which disappeared with the repeal in the US of Glass–Steagall in 1999.

Except for a temporary ban on naked short sales in Germany, the derivatives trade remains mainly unregulated.

Credit default swaps (a form of insurance on risky financial products) are still sold over-the-counter rather than through an official market, the US President having failed to follow up his 2009 promise to re-regulate these.

Meanwhile, the trillions poured into the big banks since 2008, instead of going to cash-starved small business or being used to build infrastructure and to create jobs, have largely helped fuel a new stock market bubble.

The extraordinary rise in the value of companies such as Facebook and Zynga provides a worrying parallel with the dotcom bubble of 2000.

Tax dodging is now a major growth industry—witness the latest GE scandal.

As for making the bankers pay by introducing some form of Tobin tax, there’s been much talk but little action.

Perhaps most galling of all is the injustice of using Keynesian economics to justify the need for state intervention in banking bailouts while claiming today that the profligate state caused the problem, as politicians now argue in London, Brussels and Frankfurt.

How long will sensible people go on accepting this nonsense before venting their anger on our ruling classes?


By George Irvin


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